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Southwest Created An Incredible New Baggage Change

    Southwest Created An Incredible New Baggage Change

    Southwest Airlines has built a reputation for providing complete prices without the not-so-hidden fees that other airlines frequently charge. While the company calls it “Transfarency,” a cringe-worthy term coined in a marketing lab, its concept is quite noble.

    On its website, the company defines the term:

    “Transfarency: Philosophy in which Clients are treated honestly and fairly, and low fares actually stay low — no unexpected suitcase fees, change fees, or hidden fees.”

    Essentially, Southwest Airlines is promising not to use the tricks that rivals like JetBlue, American, United, and Delta use, where certain fares come without the basic amenities you’d expect from a full-fare airline. JetBlue, for example, charges for checked bags, whereas American, United, and Delta all offer multiple fare classes.

    If you purchase an economy or basic economy ticket (terms vary by airline), your ticket may only include a seat assignment or allow you to bring a carry-on bag if you pay an additional fee. That never happens on Southwest, and the airline has remained committed to that philosophy even as competitors have discovered new ways to offer lower upfront prices while charging people more later.

    Southwest has now improved its free baggage policy by providing passengers with additional peace of mind.

    Every person who has checked a bag with an airline has a slight fear that the bag will not arrive. That’s why some people insist on carrying their bags even though checking them would be more convenient than fighting for overhead bin space and risking the dreaded “gate check.”

    By the time the “C” boarding group boards most Southwest flights, overhead bin space is at a premium. As a result, passengers may be forced to store their belongings in bins far from their seats. This slows down boarding and has the same effect when it comes time to deplane at your destination.

    If Southwest could get a few more passengers to check their bags, the problem would be alleviated and the need for a forced gate check would become rare. The airline may have discovered a solution that will encourage more passengers to check their bags.

    Southwest announced a baggage tracking tool on its X page (the former Twitter).

    “What could be better than two complimentary checked bags?” Of course, you get free checked bags that you can track—presenting digital bag tracking! “Now available on Southwest.com and in the Southwest app,” the company announced.

    The new tool informs passengers about the status of their luggage, including when it has been loaded onto the plane. That will add to the anxiety if a bag isn’t loaded before the flight, but it should make missing bags more straightforward to find and make the process run more smoothly overall.

    As you might expect, complaints about Southwest’s post mainly were unrelated to the baggage tracking news.

    “What would be even better is if my flight wasn’t so delayed that I almost missed my connection, and if you sent all of my bags with my flight.” “This is the first time I’ve ever had a bad experience with Southwest, but it was so bad that I don’t think I’ll ever fly with you again,” Christopher Williams wrote.

    Southwest, to its credit, responded to every negative comment, including Williams’s.

    “Good day, Christopher. I’m sorry to hear about your flight’s delay, and we appreciate your reaching out. Please DM your confirmation number so that we can review it and follow up. -Anthony,” wrote the airline.

    Some posters, on the other hand, seemed to enjoy the news.

    “Tracking my bags is a really cool addition,” Sharon Manlove said.

    “Excellent feature. “Perhaps some priority bag tags for us A-list Preferred customers so this bag to Cancun arrives sooner,” Marcus Allesandro added.

    Southwest Airlines returned to profitability in the most recent quarter, despite covid-related losses and issues caused by its 2022 holiday meltdown. The airline earned $240 million in net income on $6.5 billion in operating revenue.

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